ABCmouse Customer Feedback for June 2017

After a little break from posting customer feedback, I’m happy to post this selection of feedback about award-winning ABCmouse Early Learning Academy that we received in June 2017. This time, however, I’m going to offer some of the amazing and insightful feedback we’ve received from parents and teachers referencing specific ABCmouse learning activities.

The game format, as children of all different skin tones walk through the forest environment toward their camp site, was an engaging way to teach/review the five senses. The integration of forest animal needs and adaptations with the five senses lesson made the whole activity very interesting!

—Mother of an 8-year-old girl in Austin, TX

 

This is a fantastic activity! I liked how you asked students to fill in the title and label the axis. I also liked how you asked students to move the bars and compare data. Great job on this one!

—Mother in Oklahoma City, OK

 

This ABCmouse activity was engaging and easy to watch and listen to. The diversity of characters was great for all children to relate to. I liked the game that was inserted within the lesson to teach the characters about the five senses. It was a good idea to relate the senses to the environment where the characters were and indirectly teach the audience as well. The format was great as it didn’t just list the five senses and provide examples; it taught within a story that would leave students wanting to watch and learn throughout the lesson to see the end result.

—Mother of a 7-year-old boy in Atlanta, GA

 

This ABCmouse activity was a fantastic way to practice sight words AND rhyming words!

—Mother in Oklahoma City, OK

 

Great example to help with writing. Good use of writing vocabulary. I like the before-and-after example of the child’s writing. I also like how you brought us intonation. We grade on that now.

—Teacher with a 6-year-old child in Los Angeles, CA

 

I liked the ABCmouse lesson using compound words first, then moving to prefixes and suffixes, and then finally words broken into syllables. For students, this presents more familiar ways of breaking words into smaller words that they can practice and understand. As the words change, students are introduced to harder words, however, if they grasp the concept in the beginning, they will be able to break apart and read any words.

—Mother of a 7-year-old boy in Atlanta, GA

 

A great way to teach story elements. A great on-level way to break it down and explain how to write a story with all the essential elements and details. All the key vocabulary was used: setting, characters, problem, solution, etc.

—Mother of a 6-year-old girl in Los Angeles, CA

Advertisements